Curiosity · Food

Japan: Square Watermelons to Wearable Tomatoes???

Taking a look at the beloved Japan that this blog has visited once, I’m back once again to delve deeper into their more . . . interesting side of society. I’ve always wondered about the random gadgets that Japan has come up with, especially in the last few decades. Japan covers a large variety of differences being home to some of the most successful automobiles and banks companies. However, what the real question that most, and mostly I, want to know about Japan is what is up with all of their wacky inventions?! Don’t get me wrong, they’re not bad inventions, but I just wonder what kind of mind does it take to think of them?

I know that Japan’s creativity with inventions has never disappointed the interests of people domestically and internationally. Starting with their square watermelons, this

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Square Watermelon! by solution_63 © (CC BY 2.0)

may look a bit odd to international people who haven’t been able to experience the full Japanese culture yet, including myself. However, though this invention can look a little questioning at first, it is basically the same as a regular watermelon but just grown in a box to form a square shape instead. If one looks deeper into the reason why the Japanese would’ve came up with this shape, it actually makes a lot of sense! Japanese would grow watermelon in this shape since it would take up less space when packaged together, unlike regular sphere like watermelons that would roll around. Just as a little commentary though, I recommend that the round watermelons should be eaten though since the square watermelons are meant more for display and storage. Despite that, aren’t the square watermelons so cute though?

Now before I start this next section of discussing the wide array of Japanese products, let’s take a look to the picture on the left. Doesn’t that plate of sushi look absolutely fake-food-display-06stunning. Did I raise anybody’s appetite along the way. Well friends, let me introduce the 100% plastic foods designed by Japanese artists and chefs. As an act to let the world know about Japanese culture and cuisine the founder created this company to make fake foods. Going to a massive amount of detail, the artists and chefs make sure to capture just about every aspect of the food they’re are trying to recreate. Now this, is what I have to admit to true talent to make these plastic foods so similar to the real ones. Honestly, I probably would’ve fallen for its image as real food even after finding out about Japan’s fake food.

Okay, so we’ve covered about the cool and pretty smart inventions of Japanese, but there is one more that I haven’t covered yet. And this one is particularly the one I’ve been questioning until now, and I am still confused about it even after looking into it. Bringing out the wearable tomato machine, this invention was mainly targeted towards long-tomatodistance runners. Its purpose was supposed to sit on the athlete’s’ shoulders and feed them tomatoes during their run to provide continuing energy for them. I mean, when this is taken in from a different perspective, I guess it would make sense since tomatoes were stated help battle fatigue. Unfortunately, even with all the revisions to make the machine as light as possibly, it still weighs in at 8 kg. Though this invention is awfully cute (look at its face!!), I think that in the meantime, athletes can probably refrain from carrying this and just go on with the marathon. Well, unless they’re willing to, then I encourage them to go for it; this invention may prove me wrong in the future yet again.

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